Worship of Manjusri

Details

  • Title : Worship of Manjusri
  • Year : 1659
  • Classification : Manuscript Painting
  • Medium : Opaque watercolour and ink on paper
  • Dimension : 3 7/32 in. x 4 3/4 in. (8.18 cm x 12.1 cm)
  • Accession No : 1990.158
  • Country/ Geo-location : NEPAL
  • Museum : San Diego Museum of Art
  • Credit Line : Edwin Binney 3rd Collection
  • Provenance : *Doris Wiener Gallery, New York, New York ( - November 13, 1975 ) *Edwin Binney 3rd, San Diego, California ( November 13, 1975 - August 27, 1990 ) *San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego, California ( August 27, 1990 - )
  • Label Copy : Label Copy: September 2005 Devotional Arts of Nepal Nepalese manuscripts of the seventeenth century and later were generally written and painted on yellow paper in the horizontal format. New stylistic and cultural incursions from India are noticeable in the dress and profile presentation of the worshippers. From China via Tibet, we see vivid peony-like flowers and altercating dragons, which the Nepali painters provided with snow lion or elephant heads. Two images deeply associated with Nepali identity are the stupa and the Bodhisattva Manjushri. The distinctively Nepali form of the Buddhist monument called a stupa consists of a solid white hemisphere surmounted by a cylinder painted with eyes, over which a conical series of parasols are arranged. The Bodhisattva of wisdom, Manjushri, is said to have drained water out of the Kathmandu valley by cutting a gorge in the mountains with his sword. In this way, the spiritual purity and beauty of the valley and its Stupas could be experienced by all. Sonya Quintanilla (2014) Quebec Label Worship of a stupa Worship of Manjusri Pair of Buddhist manuscript covers Nepal, 1659 Opaque watercolour and ink on paper and wood Edwin Binney 3rd Collection, 1990.157, .158, .159.a-b Nepalese manuscripts of the seventeenth century and later were generally written and painted on yellow paper in the horizontal format. New stylistic and cultural incursions from India are noticeable in the dress and profile presentation of the worshippers. From China via Tibet, we see vivid peony-like flowers and altercating dragons, which the Nepali painters provided with snow lion or elephant heads. Two images deeply associated with Nepali identity are the stupa and the bodhisattva Manjushri. The distinctively Nepali form of the Buddhist monument called a stupa consists of a solid white hemisphere surmounted by a cylinder painted with eyes, over which a conical series of parasols are arranged. The bodhisattva of wisdom, Manjushri, is said to have drained water out of the Kathmandu valley by cutting a gorge in the mountains with his sword. In this way, the spiritual purity and beauty of the valley and its Stupas could be experienced by all.
  • Exhibition History : Into India: South Asian Paintings from The San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego Museum of Art, 2/28/2012 - 5/27/2012